ALA Midwinter is not classically thought of as a galley gala (that would be BookExpo America). Thanks to the creative and zany marketing efforts of the Trade Libraries Joint Committee of the Association of American Publishers, however, the conference puts trade book programming front and center. See the AAP’s Family Feud, in which librarians face off with marquee writers like Jonathan Evison.
As she did for ALA Annual and BookExpo America, Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal's editor of Prepub Alert, has produced a galley guide for ALA Midwinter. Now winter and spring titles, which tend to get overshadowed by summer and fall pubs, have a credible forum, not to mention a receptive audience.
Hoffert on the trends she’s seeing:


The trade paperback original keeps rising, literate 19th-century American saga is emergent (see Kent Wascom’s The Blood of Heaven and Philipp Meyer’sThe Son), fantastical elements are appearing in nonfantasy works (see Rhonda Riley’s The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope and Helene Wecker’s The Golem and the Jinni), thrillers are becoming intensely psychological and family-centered (e.g., Kimberly McCreight’sReconstructing Amelia), Africa draws our attention in literature as in the news (see Yejide Kilanko’s Daughters Who Walk This Path and Eleanor Morse’s White Dog Fell from the Sky), and small-town dysfunction is still with us (see Holly Goddard Jones’s Next Time You See Meand Laura Lee Smith’s Heart of Palm).

ALA Midwinter is not classically thought of as a galley gala (that would be BookExpo America). Thanks to the creative and zany marketing efforts of the Trade Libraries Joint Committee of the Association of American Publishers, however, the conference puts trade book programming front and center. See the AAP’s Family Feud, in which librarians face off with marquee writers like Jonathan Evison.

As she did for ALA Annual and BookExpo America, Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal's editor of Prepub Alert, has produced a galley guide for ALA Midwinter. Now winter and spring titles, which tend to get overshadowed by summer and fall pubs, have a credible forum, not to mention a receptive audience.

Hoffert on the trends she’s seeing:

The trade paperback original keeps rising, literate 19th-century American saga is emergent (see Kent Wascom’s The Blood of Heaven and Philipp Meyer’sThe Son), fantastical elements are appearing in nonfantasy works (see Rhonda Riley’s The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope and Helene Wecker’s The Golem and the Jinni), thrillers are becoming intensely psychological and family-centered (e.g., Kimberly McCreight’sReconstructing Amelia), Africa draws our attention in literature as in the news (see Yejide Kilanko’s Daughters Who Walk This Path and Eleanor Morse’s White Dog Fell from the Sky), and small-town dysfunction is still with us (see Holly Goddard Jones’s Next Time You See Meand Laura Lee Smith’s Heart of Palm).

  1. schoollibraryjournal reblogged this from libraryjournal and added:
    Going to ALA Midwinter? Download Library Journal's galley guide.
  2. nomoretexasgovernorsforpresident reblogged this from libraryjournal
  3. juliekane reblogged this from libraryjournal
  4. mwisger reblogged this from libraryjournal and added:
    Oh, nice.
  5. libraryjournal reblogged this from cloudunbound and added:
    Ditto! Download Barbara’s guide!
  6. cloudunbound posted this