CLOUD UNBOUND

Libraries, ebooks, publishing, and all the sublimely prickly stuff in between as viewed by Heather McCormack, Collection Development Manager, 3M Cloud Library

CLOUD UNBOUND

Libraries, ebooks, publishing, discovery
Constellation, a division of Cloud publishing partner Perseus Books Group, represents over 400 quality publishers, including Grove/Atlantic and McSweeney’s, now all live in the Cloud. Core Backlist TK! 
Zoom Info
Constellation, a division of Cloud publishing partner Perseus Books Group, represents over 400 quality publishers, including Grove/Atlantic and McSweeney’s, now all live in the Cloud. Core Backlist TK! 
Zoom Info
Constellation, a division of Cloud publishing partner Perseus Books Group, represents over 400 quality publishers, including Grove/Atlantic and McSweeney’s, now all live in the Cloud. Core Backlist TK! 
Zoom Info

Constellation, a division of Cloud publishing partner Perseus Books Group, represents over 400 quality publishers, including Grove/Atlantic and McSweeney’s, now all live in the Cloud. Core Backlist TK! 

Ahhhhh! Wait, What’s Changing?

KEY BACKLIST What a week! I blink on Monday, then it’s Friday, 12:29 pm. At any rate, I would be remiss if I didn’t talk up choice oldies but goodies because, as we all know, even the most voracious reader in the world hasn’t read every title categorized as backlist. Nine times out of ten, I would bet most of your power patrons haven’t read even one entry in Agatha Christie’s classic Hercule Poirot mystery series, revived as of this week with the publication of The Monogram Murders, a Top New Release. The Cloud contains a couple dozen, including Five Little Pigs.
My first read of the fall, Maj Sjowell and Per Wahloo’s The Laughing Detective, book four in the Martin Beck private detective series and winner of the 1971 Edgar Award for Best Novel, has pulled out my eyes like a magnet, to paraphrase Elvis Costello. The characterizations are superb to the point of being 3-D, and the dialogue like tattoos I see on my arm. Sex, death, love, murder, and the Swedish welfare state: this is literature. Try it out on your patrons who don’t do genre fiction.
It’s back-to-school daze, and Sara Farizan’s If You Could Be Mine, a 2013 young adult novel about two young Iranian women in love, came to my attention again when it won a slew of awards over the summer, first and foremost the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Children’s/Young Adult. This is one for book groups and your teen and adult readers who love to plumb heartbreak and angst.
 Finally, we’re on the brink of National Hispanic Heritage month (September 15-October 15). Julia Alvarez, an Algonquin writer like Farizan, is a wonderful option to steep your readers in culture that is American, no question about it. 

  
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST What a week! I blink on Monday, then it’s Friday, 12:29 pm. At any rate, I would be remiss if I didn’t talk up choice oldies but goodies because, as we all know, even the most voracious reader in the world hasn’t read every title categorized as backlist. Nine times out of ten, I would bet most of your power patrons haven’t read even one entry in Agatha Christie’s classic Hercule Poirot mystery series, revived as of this week with the publication of The Monogram Murders, a Top New Release. The Cloud contains a couple dozen, including Five Little Pigs.
My first read of the fall, Maj Sjowell and Per Wahloo’s The Laughing Detective, book four in the Martin Beck private detective series and winner of the 1971 Edgar Award for Best Novel, has pulled out my eyes like a magnet, to paraphrase Elvis Costello. The characterizations are superb to the point of being 3-D, and the dialogue like tattoos I see on my arm. Sex, death, love, murder, and the Swedish welfare state: this is literature. Try it out on your patrons who don’t do genre fiction.
It’s back-to-school daze, and Sara Farizan’s If You Could Be Mine, a 2013 young adult novel about two young Iranian women in love, came to my attention again when it won a slew of awards over the summer, first and foremost the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Children’s/Young Adult. This is one for book groups and your teen and adult readers who love to plumb heartbreak and angst.
 Finally, we’re on the brink of National Hispanic Heritage month (September 15-October 15). Julia Alvarez, an Algonquin writer like Farizan, is a wonderful option to steep your readers in culture that is American, no question about it. 

  
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST What a week! I blink on Monday, then it’s Friday, 12:29 pm. At any rate, I would be remiss if I didn’t talk up choice oldies but goodies because, as we all know, even the most voracious reader in the world hasn’t read every title categorized as backlist. Nine times out of ten, I would bet most of your power patrons haven’t read even one entry in Agatha Christie’s classic Hercule Poirot mystery series, revived as of this week with the publication of The Monogram Murders, a Top New Release. The Cloud contains a couple dozen, including Five Little Pigs.
My first read of the fall, Maj Sjowell and Per Wahloo’s The Laughing Detective, book four in the Martin Beck private detective series and winner of the 1971 Edgar Award for Best Novel, has pulled out my eyes like a magnet, to paraphrase Elvis Costello. The characterizations are superb to the point of being 3-D, and the dialogue like tattoos I see on my arm. Sex, death, love, murder, and the Swedish welfare state: this is literature. Try it out on your patrons who don’t do genre fiction.
It’s back-to-school daze, and Sara Farizan’s If You Could Be Mine, a 2013 young adult novel about two young Iranian women in love, came to my attention again when it won a slew of awards over the summer, first and foremost the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Children’s/Young Adult. This is one for book groups and your teen and adult readers who love to plumb heartbreak and angst.
 Finally, we’re on the brink of National Hispanic Heritage month (September 15-October 15). Julia Alvarez, an Algonquin writer like Farizan, is a wonderful option to steep your readers in culture that is American, no question about it. 

  
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST What a week! I blink on Monday, then it’s Friday, 12:29 pm. At any rate, I would be remiss if I didn’t talk up choice oldies but goodies because, as we all know, even the most voracious reader in the world hasn’t read every title categorized as backlist. Nine times out of ten, I would bet most of your power patrons haven’t read even one entry in Agatha Christie’s classic Hercule Poirot mystery series, revived as of this week with the publication of The Monogram Murders, a Top New Release. The Cloud contains a couple dozen, including Five Little Pigs.
My first read of the fall, Maj Sjowell and Per Wahloo’s The Laughing Detective, book four in the Martin Beck private detective series and winner of the 1971 Edgar Award for Best Novel, has pulled out my eyes like a magnet, to paraphrase Elvis Costello. The characterizations are superb to the point of being 3-D, and the dialogue like tattoos I see on my arm. Sex, death, love, murder, and the Swedish welfare state: this is literature. Try it out on your patrons who don’t do genre fiction.
It’s back-to-school daze, and Sara Farizan’s If You Could Be Mine, a 2013 young adult novel about two young Iranian women in love, came to my attention again when it won a slew of awards over the summer, first and foremost the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Children’s/Young Adult. This is one for book groups and your teen and adult readers who love to plumb heartbreak and angst.
 Finally, we’re on the brink of National Hispanic Heritage month (September 15-October 15). Julia Alvarez, an Algonquin writer like Farizan, is a wonderful option to steep your readers in culture that is American, no question about it. 

  
Zoom Info

KEY BACKLIST What a week! I blink on Monday, then it’s Friday, 12:29 pm. At any rate, I would be remiss if I didn’t talk up choice oldies but goodies because, as we all know, even the most voracious reader in the world hasn’t read every title categorized as backlist. Nine times out of ten, I would bet most of your power patrons haven’t read even one entry in Agatha Christie’s classic Hercule Poirot mystery series, revived as of this week with the publication of The Monogram Murders, a Top New Release. The Cloud contains a couple dozen, including Five Little Pigs.

My first read of the fall, Maj Sjowell and Per Wahloo’s The Laughing Detective, book four in the Martin Beck private detective series and winner of the 1971 Edgar Award for Best Novel, has pulled out my eyes like a magnet, to paraphrase Elvis Costello. The characterizations are superb to the point of being 3-D, and the dialogue like tattoos I see on my arm. Sex, death, love, murder, and the Swedish welfare state: this is literature. Try it out on your patrons who don’t do genre fiction.

It’s back-to-school daze, and Sara Farizan’s If You Could Be Mine, a 2013 young adult novel about two young Iranian women in love, came to my attention again when it won a slew of awards over the summer, first and foremost the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Children’s/Young Adult. This is one for book groups and your teen and adult readers who love to plumb heartbreak and angst.

 Finally, we’re on the brink of National Hispanic Heritage month (September 15-October 15). Julia Alvarez, an Algonquin writer like Farizan, is a wonderful option to steep your readers in culture that is American, no question about it. 

  

"Some 88 percent of Americans younger than 30 said they read a book in the past year compared with 79 percent of those older than 30. At the same time, American readers’ relationship with public libraries is changing—with younger readers less likely to see public libraries as essential in their communities."



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Adrienne LaFrance summarizes the latest Pew Research Center study at The Atlantic. Overall, it’s good news for us passionates in the library and publishing spaces. The rising generation is inclined to consume information and has a tendency to view the physical library as a “quiet, safe place.”

The Internet may be a kind of home to millennials (and other generations, it should probably be said), but they know there’s content of value that exists elsewhere. Library opportunity right there.



¡Feliz cumpleaños!

A foundation of the Latin American publishing industry that will help pave the way toward digitization of Spanish content, in case you didn’t know. I’ll be seeing them at the Guadalajara International Book Fair in December.

KEY BACKLIST The prime pickings don’t quit, kids. With the imminent release of 20,000 Days on Earth, the acclaimed documentary chronicling his envelope-pushing career, Nick Cave’s 2009 novel, The Death of Bunny Munro, could see a resurgence. Bettina Stangneth’s well-reviewed Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer could have the same effect on Hannah Erendt’s controversial classic, Eichmann in Jerusalem. As a fan of Australian contemporary fiction, I have to point you to Christos Tsiolkas’s debut, The Slap, as it’s soon to be made into an NBC miniseries. Tsiolkas’s latest novel, Barracuda, was a perfect dog-days-of-summer read, melancholy but optimistic about the potential to grow up and grow into yourself.
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST The prime pickings don’t quit, kids. With the imminent release of 20,000 Days on Earth, the acclaimed documentary chronicling his envelope-pushing career, Nick Cave’s 2009 novel, The Death of Bunny Munro, could see a resurgence. Bettina Stangneth’s well-reviewed Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer could have the same effect on Hannah Erendt’s controversial classic, Eichmann in Jerusalem. As a fan of Australian contemporary fiction, I have to point you to Christos Tsiolkas’s debut, The Slap, as it’s soon to be made into an NBC miniseries. Tsiolkas’s latest novel, Barracuda, was a perfect dog-days-of-summer read, melancholy but optimistic about the potential to grow up and grow into yourself.
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST The prime pickings don’t quit, kids. With the imminent release of 20,000 Days on Earth, the acclaimed documentary chronicling his envelope-pushing career, Nick Cave’s 2009 novel, The Death of Bunny Munro, could see a resurgence. Bettina Stangneth’s well-reviewed Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer could have the same effect on Hannah Erendt’s controversial classic, Eichmann in Jerusalem. As a fan of Australian contemporary fiction, I have to point you to Christos Tsiolkas’s debut, The Slap, as it’s soon to be made into an NBC miniseries. Tsiolkas’s latest novel, Barracuda, was a perfect dog-days-of-summer read, melancholy but optimistic about the potential to grow up and grow into yourself.
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST The prime pickings don’t quit, kids. With the imminent release of 20,000 Days on Earth, the acclaimed documentary chronicling his envelope-pushing career, Nick Cave’s 2009 novel, The Death of Bunny Munro, could see a resurgence. Bettina Stangneth’s well-reviewed Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer could have the same effect on Hannah Erendt’s controversial classic, Eichmann in Jerusalem. As a fan of Australian contemporary fiction, I have to point you to Christos Tsiolkas’s debut, The Slap, as it’s soon to be made into an NBC miniseries. Tsiolkas’s latest novel, Barracuda, was a perfect dog-days-of-summer read, melancholy but optimistic about the potential to grow up and grow into yourself.
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST The prime pickings don’t quit, kids. With the imminent release of 20,000 Days on Earth, the acclaimed documentary chronicling his envelope-pushing career, Nick Cave’s 2009 novel, The Death of Bunny Munro, could see a resurgence. Bettina Stangneth’s well-reviewed Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer could have the same effect on Hannah Erendt’s controversial classic, Eichmann in Jerusalem. As a fan of Australian contemporary fiction, I have to point you to Christos Tsiolkas’s debut, The Slap, as it’s soon to be made into an NBC miniseries. Tsiolkas’s latest novel, Barracuda, was a perfect dog-days-of-summer read, melancholy but optimistic about the potential to grow up and grow into yourself.
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST The prime pickings don’t quit, kids. With the imminent release of 20,000 Days on Earth, the acclaimed documentary chronicling his envelope-pushing career, Nick Cave’s 2009 novel, The Death of Bunny Munro, could see a resurgence. Bettina Stangneth’s well-reviewed Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer could have the same effect on Hannah Erendt’s controversial classic, Eichmann in Jerusalem. As a fan of Australian contemporary fiction, I have to point you to Christos Tsiolkas’s debut, The Slap, as it’s soon to be made into an NBC miniseries. Tsiolkas’s latest novel, Barracuda, was a perfect dog-days-of-summer read, melancholy but optimistic about the potential to grow up and grow into yourself.
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST The prime pickings don’t quit, kids. With the imminent release of 20,000 Days on Earth, the acclaimed documentary chronicling his envelope-pushing career, Nick Cave’s 2009 novel, The Death of Bunny Munro, could see a resurgence. Bettina Stangneth’s well-reviewed Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer could have the same effect on Hannah Erendt’s controversial classic, Eichmann in Jerusalem. As a fan of Australian contemporary fiction, I have to point you to Christos Tsiolkas’s debut, The Slap, as it’s soon to be made into an NBC miniseries. Tsiolkas’s latest novel, Barracuda, was a perfect dog-days-of-summer read, melancholy but optimistic about the potential to grow up and grow into yourself.
Zoom Info

KEY BACKLIST The prime pickings don’t quit, kids. With the imminent release of 20,000 Days on Earth, the acclaimed documentary chronicling his envelope-pushing career, Nick Cave’s 2009 novel, The Death of Bunny Munro, could see a resurgence. Bettina Stangneth’s well-reviewed Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer could have the same effect on Hannah Erendt’s controversial classic, Eichmann in Jerusalem. As a fan of Australian contemporary fiction, I have to point you to Christos Tsiolkas’s debut, The Slap, as it’s soon to be made into an NBC miniseries. Tsiolkas’s latest novel, Barracuda, was a perfect dog-days-of-summer read, melancholy but optimistic about the potential to grow up and grow into yourself.