CLOUD UNBOUND

Libraries, ebooks, publishing, and all the sublimely prickly stuff in between as viewed by Heather McCormack, Collection Development Manager, 3M Cloud Library

CLOUD UNBOUND

Libraries, ebooks, publishing, discovery

"The Guardian called the book ‘the most compelling autobiography ever to appear under a footballer’s name.’ He is skillful. He is outspoken. He is Zlatan."



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Jack Bell of The New York Times in his delightful roundup of new and classic soccer (football) books, nonfiction and fiction, including Zlatan Ibrahimovic’s best-selling and critically acclaimed I Am Zlatan Ibrahimovic, just out from Cloud publishing partner Random House.

Methinks a World Cup Recommended Reads shelf is coming.



KEY BACKLIST Last winter, Cloud publishing partner Penguin rekindled interest in the late Shirley Jackson by giving her best known works the black-spine treatment. Entertainment Weekly wrote up the reissue program, citing both Stephen King and Guillermo del Toro as fans of the 1959 supernatural thriller, The Haunting of Hill House, about four seekers who find more than they bargained for in the titular abode.
Adding to Jackson’s resurgence is another Penguin title, Susan Scarf Merrell’s new novel, Shirley, which intermingles fact with fiction: a young couple moves into the bustling home of Shirley Jackson and her critic husband, Stanley Edgar Hyman, in Vermont. Here’s Kirkus:

"When Rose learns of a student who went missing 18 years earlier, she’s unable to resist the notion that Shirley had something to do with it. Merrell is no thriller writer, but this unsolved mystery stokes an atmosphere of quiet menace. Her decision to blend fact and fiction adds to a lingering sense of uncertainty, with set pieces—including a cameo for Bernard Malamud—providing comic relief. A sidelong portrait of a category-defying writer dovetails surprisingly snugly with the drama of one young woman’s coming-of-age."

Summer reading? Why, yes, for your literary types who love more than a few whiffs of horror.
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST Last winter, Cloud publishing partner Penguin rekindled interest in the late Shirley Jackson by giving her best known works the black-spine treatment. Entertainment Weekly wrote up the reissue program, citing both Stephen King and Guillermo del Toro as fans of the 1959 supernatural thriller, The Haunting of Hill House, about four seekers who find more than they bargained for in the titular abode.
Adding to Jackson’s resurgence is another Penguin title, Susan Scarf Merrell’s new novel, Shirley, which intermingles fact with fiction: a young couple moves into the bustling home of Shirley Jackson and her critic husband, Stanley Edgar Hyman, in Vermont. Here’s Kirkus:

"When Rose learns of a student who went missing 18 years earlier, she’s unable to resist the notion that Shirley had something to do with it. Merrell is no thriller writer, but this unsolved mystery stokes an atmosphere of quiet menace. Her decision to blend fact and fiction adds to a lingering sense of uncertainty, with set pieces—including a cameo for Bernard Malamud—providing comic relief. A sidelong portrait of a category-defying writer dovetails surprisingly snugly with the drama of one young woman’s coming-of-age."

Summer reading? Why, yes, for your literary types who love more than a few whiffs of horror.
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST Last winter, Cloud publishing partner Penguin rekindled interest in the late Shirley Jackson by giving her best known works the black-spine treatment. Entertainment Weekly wrote up the reissue program, citing both Stephen King and Guillermo del Toro as fans of the 1959 supernatural thriller, The Haunting of Hill House, about four seekers who find more than they bargained for in the titular abode.
Adding to Jackson’s resurgence is another Penguin title, Susan Scarf Merrell’s new novel, Shirley, which intermingles fact with fiction: a young couple moves into the bustling home of Shirley Jackson and her critic husband, Stanley Edgar Hyman, in Vermont. Here’s Kirkus:

"When Rose learns of a student who went missing 18 years earlier, she’s unable to resist the notion that Shirley had something to do with it. Merrell is no thriller writer, but this unsolved mystery stokes an atmosphere of quiet menace. Her decision to blend fact and fiction adds to a lingering sense of uncertainty, with set pieces—including a cameo for Bernard Malamud—providing comic relief. A sidelong portrait of a category-defying writer dovetails surprisingly snugly with the drama of one young woman’s coming-of-age."

Summer reading? Why, yes, for your literary types who love more than a few whiffs of horror.
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST Last winter, Cloud publishing partner Penguin rekindled interest in the late Shirley Jackson by giving her best known works the black-spine treatment. Entertainment Weekly wrote up the reissue program, citing both Stephen King and Guillermo del Toro as fans of the 1959 supernatural thriller, The Haunting of Hill House, about four seekers who find more than they bargained for in the titular abode.
Adding to Jackson’s resurgence is another Penguin title, Susan Scarf Merrell’s new novel, Shirley, which intermingles fact with fiction: a young couple moves into the bustling home of Shirley Jackson and her critic husband, Stanley Edgar Hyman, in Vermont. Here’s Kirkus:

"When Rose learns of a student who went missing 18 years earlier, she’s unable to resist the notion that Shirley had something to do with it. Merrell is no thriller writer, but this unsolved mystery stokes an atmosphere of quiet menace. Her decision to blend fact and fiction adds to a lingering sense of uncertainty, with set pieces—including a cameo for Bernard Malamud—providing comic relief. A sidelong portrait of a category-defying writer dovetails surprisingly snugly with the drama of one young woman’s coming-of-age."

Summer reading? Why, yes, for your literary types who love more than a few whiffs of horror.
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST Last winter, Cloud publishing partner Penguin rekindled interest in the late Shirley Jackson by giving her best known works the black-spine treatment. Entertainment Weekly wrote up the reissue program, citing both Stephen King and Guillermo del Toro as fans of the 1959 supernatural thriller, The Haunting of Hill House, about four seekers who find more than they bargained for in the titular abode.
Adding to Jackson’s resurgence is another Penguin title, Susan Scarf Merrell’s new novel, Shirley, which intermingles fact with fiction: a young couple moves into the bustling home of Shirley Jackson and her critic husband, Stanley Edgar Hyman, in Vermont. Here’s Kirkus:

"When Rose learns of a student who went missing 18 years earlier, she’s unable to resist the notion that Shirley had something to do with it. Merrell is no thriller writer, but this unsolved mystery stokes an atmosphere of quiet menace. Her decision to blend fact and fiction adds to a lingering sense of uncertainty, with set pieces—including a cameo for Bernard Malamud—providing comic relief. A sidelong portrait of a category-defying writer dovetails surprisingly snugly with the drama of one young woman’s coming-of-age."

Summer reading? Why, yes, for your literary types who love more than a few whiffs of horror.
Zoom Info

KEY BACKLIST Last winter, Cloud publishing partner Penguin rekindled interest in the late Shirley Jackson by giving her best known works the black-spine treatment. Entertainment Weekly wrote up the reissue program, citing both Stephen King and Guillermo del Toro as fans of the 1959 supernatural thriller, The Haunting of Hill House, about four seekers who find more than they bargained for in the titular abode.

Adding to Jackson’s resurgence is another Penguin title, Susan Scarf Merrell’s new novel, Shirley, which intermingles fact with fiction: a young couple moves into the bustling home of Shirley Jackson and her critic husbandStanley Edgar Hyman, in Vermont. Here’s Kirkus:

"When Rose learns of a student who went missing 18 years earlier, she’s unable to resist the notion that Shirley had something to do with it. Merrell is no thriller writer, but this unsolved mystery stokes an atmosphere of quiet menace. Her decision to blend fact and fiction adds to a lingering sense of uncertainty, with set pieces—including a cameo for Bernard Malamud—providing comic relief. A sidelong portrait of a category-defying writer dovetails surprisingly snugly with the drama of one young woman’s coming-of-age."

Summer reading? Why, yes, for your literary types who love more than a few whiffs of horror.

An Indie Publisher Announcement

"Christopher Foyle admitted in his speech that no bookshop “has a divine right to exist,” no matter how glorious its history. In its battle with Amazon [Foyles] needs to become more commercially savvy – and its planned 200 author events a year in its new gallery upstairs, and literary tours, should help that."



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Sameer Rahim of The Telegraph tours the new flagship store of Foyles, the esteemed, longtime independent London bookshop on Charing Cross Road where I buy my books in that great city now that Clerkenwell Tales is moving to Toronto.

I’m glad to hear about the programming and the importance still given to deep selection, often designated the old Foyles way by publisher. You know what else I’d like to see? Co-programming with public libraries in the UK. 



Good news for our Canadian libraries: Core Backlist for Penguin Canada and Scholastic Canada are live. This means I’ve taken the guesswork out of which titles you should buy to ensure a collection with high circulation and reader satisfaction. (Remember, this marks the first time Penguin Canada has sold ebooks to libraries.)
Drawing on our new publishing partners’ sales data, I’ve shelved best-selling fiction and nonfiction of the last few years for adults and young readers. In other words, all killer, no filler.
Zoom Info
Good news for our Canadian libraries: Core Backlist for Penguin Canada and Scholastic Canada are live. This means I’ve taken the guesswork out of which titles you should buy to ensure a collection with high circulation and reader satisfaction. (Remember, this marks the first time Penguin Canada has sold ebooks to libraries.)
Drawing on our new publishing partners’ sales data, I’ve shelved best-selling fiction and nonfiction of the last few years for adults and young readers. In other words, all killer, no filler.
Zoom Info

Good news for our Canadian libraries: Core Backlist for Penguin Canada and Scholastic Canada are live. This means I’ve taken the guesswork out of which titles you should buy to ensure a collection with high circulation and reader satisfaction. (Remember, this marks the first time Penguin Canada has sold ebooks to libraries.)

Drawing on our new publishing partners’ sales data, I’ve shelved best-selling fiction and nonfiction of the last few years for adults and young readers. In other words, all killer, no filler.