CLOUD UNBOUND

Libraries, ebooks, publishing, and all the sublimely prickly stuff in between as viewed by Heather McCormack, Collection Development Manager, 3M Cloud Library

CLOUD UNBOUND

Libraries, ebooks, publishing, discovery
Not that you’d notice I’ve been missing because the Tumblr keeps a-whirling no matter the weather, but in case you were wondering, this is what took up most of the last three weeks, in terms of planning and, you know, being there and not collapsing from exhaustion-amusement.
My third Frankfurt Book Fair (aka buchmesse, in German) ranks as the most productive yet in terms of spreading the good word about the library market, which has ample room to grow. All but a handful of American publishers are in the game 100 percent and invested in exploring how best to connect with collection development librarians and even end users, aka patrons. I wouldn’t be surprised to see experimentation with models in 2015. A message of ours at the fair: it would be great for the midlist and backlist if librarians had more choice in how they bought.
Canada, whose library system comes close to America’s on funding, is showing strong signs of expansion, possibly because of our entrance in March. At the show, I made it a goal to talk with Canadian publishers about how to leverage the Canadian-grown parts of their lists. My deepest thanks to Dundurn Press, ECW Press, Ebound Canada, University of Regina Press, De Marque, and ANEL for their time and feedback. You’ll see hopefully positive results from my experiments in early 2015.
The United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand glimmer not too far off on the horizon. The mood among publishers from those countries was overwhelmingly positive. I cannot say enough how much I appreciate the reception we’ve been given. Sending out undulations of gratitude to Emma House of the Publishers Association, Sandy Mahal formerly of The Reading Agency, Stephen Page of Faber & Faber, Zoe Dattner of Sleepers Publishing, and Chris McCrudden of Midas PR.   
Other reasons to love Frankfurt: Amazon was nowhere in sight, you feel the freedom to dream big, pork is sold in all corners, and the camaraderie is unlike that found any other fair in the world. This is a profession built on passion, make no mistake. I’m still high from being so close to so many brilliant minds.
Next year, I want to bring a librarian envoy. Raise your hand if you’re in.  
Zoom Info
Not that you’d notice I’ve been missing because the Tumblr keeps a-whirling no matter the weather, but in case you were wondering, this is what took up most of the last three weeks, in terms of planning and, you know, being there and not collapsing from exhaustion-amusement.
My third Frankfurt Book Fair (aka buchmesse, in German) ranks as the most productive yet in terms of spreading the good word about the library market, which has ample room to grow. All but a handful of American publishers are in the game 100 percent and invested in exploring how best to connect with collection development librarians and even end users, aka patrons. I wouldn’t be surprised to see experimentation with models in 2015. A message of ours at the fair: it would be great for the midlist and backlist if librarians had more choice in how they bought.
Canada, whose library system comes close to America’s on funding, is showing strong signs of expansion, possibly because of our entrance in March. At the show, I made it a goal to talk with Canadian publishers about how to leverage the Canadian-grown parts of their lists. My deepest thanks to Dundurn Press, ECW Press, Ebound Canada, University of Regina Press, De Marque, and ANEL for their time and feedback. You’ll see hopefully positive results from my experiments in early 2015.
The United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand glimmer not too far off on the horizon. The mood among publishers from those countries was overwhelmingly positive. I cannot say enough how much I appreciate the reception we’ve been given. Sending out undulations of gratitude to Emma House of the Publishers Association, Sandy Mahal formerly of The Reading Agency, Stephen Page of Faber & Faber, Zoe Dattner of Sleepers Publishing, and Chris McCrudden of Midas PR.   
Other reasons to love Frankfurt: Amazon was nowhere in sight, you feel the freedom to dream big, pork is sold in all corners, and the camaraderie is unlike that found any other fair in the world. This is a profession built on passion, make no mistake. I’m still high from being so close to so many brilliant minds.
Next year, I want to bring a librarian envoy. Raise your hand if you’re in.  
Zoom Info
Not that you’d notice I’ve been missing because the Tumblr keeps a-whirling no matter the weather, but in case you were wondering, this is what took up most of the last three weeks, in terms of planning and, you know, being there and not collapsing from exhaustion-amusement.
My third Frankfurt Book Fair (aka buchmesse, in German) ranks as the most productive yet in terms of spreading the good word about the library market, which has ample room to grow. All but a handful of American publishers are in the game 100 percent and invested in exploring how best to connect with collection development librarians and even end users, aka patrons. I wouldn’t be surprised to see experimentation with models in 2015. A message of ours at the fair: it would be great for the midlist and backlist if librarians had more choice in how they bought.
Canada, whose library system comes close to America’s on funding, is showing strong signs of expansion, possibly because of our entrance in March. At the show, I made it a goal to talk with Canadian publishers about how to leverage the Canadian-grown parts of their lists. My deepest thanks to Dundurn Press, ECW Press, Ebound Canada, University of Regina Press, De Marque, and ANEL for their time and feedback. You’ll see hopefully positive results from my experiments in early 2015.
The United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand glimmer not too far off on the horizon. The mood among publishers from those countries was overwhelmingly positive. I cannot say enough how much I appreciate the reception we’ve been given. Sending out undulations of gratitude to Emma House of the Publishers Association, Sandy Mahal formerly of The Reading Agency, Stephen Page of Faber & Faber, Zoe Dattner of Sleepers Publishing, and Chris McCrudden of Midas PR.   
Other reasons to love Frankfurt: Amazon was nowhere in sight, you feel the freedom to dream big, pork is sold in all corners, and the camaraderie is unlike that found any other fair in the world. This is a profession built on passion, make no mistake. I’m still high from being so close to so many brilliant minds.
Next year, I want to bring a librarian envoy. Raise your hand if you’re in.  
Zoom Info
Not that you’d notice I’ve been missing because the Tumblr keeps a-whirling no matter the weather, but in case you were wondering, this is what took up most of the last three weeks, in terms of planning and, you know, being there and not collapsing from exhaustion-amusement.
My third Frankfurt Book Fair (aka buchmesse, in German) ranks as the most productive yet in terms of spreading the good word about the library market, which has ample room to grow. All but a handful of American publishers are in the game 100 percent and invested in exploring how best to connect with collection development librarians and even end users, aka patrons. I wouldn’t be surprised to see experimentation with models in 2015. A message of ours at the fair: it would be great for the midlist and backlist if librarians had more choice in how they bought.
Canada, whose library system comes close to America’s on funding, is showing strong signs of expansion, possibly because of our entrance in March. At the show, I made it a goal to talk with Canadian publishers about how to leverage the Canadian-grown parts of their lists. My deepest thanks to Dundurn Press, ECW Press, Ebound Canada, University of Regina Press, De Marque, and ANEL for their time and feedback. You’ll see hopefully positive results from my experiments in early 2015.
The United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand glimmer not too far off on the horizon. The mood among publishers from those countries was overwhelmingly positive. I cannot say enough how much I appreciate the reception we’ve been given. Sending out undulations of gratitude to Emma House of the Publishers Association, Sandy Mahal formerly of The Reading Agency, Stephen Page of Faber & Faber, Zoe Dattner of Sleepers Publishing, and Chris McCrudden of Midas PR.   
Other reasons to love Frankfurt: Amazon was nowhere in sight, you feel the freedom to dream big, pork is sold in all corners, and the camaraderie is unlike that found any other fair in the world. This is a profession built on passion, make no mistake. I’m still high from being so close to so many brilliant minds.
Next year, I want to bring a librarian envoy. Raise your hand if you’re in.  
Zoom Info
Not that you’d notice I’ve been missing because the Tumblr keeps a-whirling no matter the weather, but in case you were wondering, this is what took up most of the last three weeks, in terms of planning and, you know, being there and not collapsing from exhaustion-amusement.
My third Frankfurt Book Fair (aka buchmesse, in German) ranks as the most productive yet in terms of spreading the good word about the library market, which has ample room to grow. All but a handful of American publishers are in the game 100 percent and invested in exploring how best to connect with collection development librarians and even end users, aka patrons. I wouldn’t be surprised to see experimentation with models in 2015. A message of ours at the fair: it would be great for the midlist and backlist if librarians had more choice in how they bought.
Canada, whose library system comes close to America’s on funding, is showing strong signs of expansion, possibly because of our entrance in March. At the show, I made it a goal to talk with Canadian publishers about how to leverage the Canadian-grown parts of their lists. My deepest thanks to Dundurn Press, ECW Press, Ebound Canada, University of Regina Press, De Marque, and ANEL for their time and feedback. You’ll see hopefully positive results from my experiments in early 2015.
The United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand glimmer not too far off on the horizon. The mood among publishers from those countries was overwhelmingly positive. I cannot say enough how much I appreciate the reception we’ve been given. Sending out undulations of gratitude to Emma House of the Publishers Association, Sandy Mahal formerly of The Reading Agency, Stephen Page of Faber & Faber, Zoe Dattner of Sleepers Publishing, and Chris McCrudden of Midas PR.   
Other reasons to love Frankfurt: Amazon was nowhere in sight, you feel the freedom to dream big, pork is sold in all corners, and the camaraderie is unlike that found any other fair in the world. This is a profession built on passion, make no mistake. I’m still high from being so close to so many brilliant minds.
Next year, I want to bring a librarian envoy. Raise your hand if you’re in.  
Zoom Info
Not that you’d notice I’ve been missing because the Tumblr keeps a-whirling no matter the weather, but in case you were wondering, this is what took up most of the last three weeks, in terms of planning and, you know, being there and not collapsing from exhaustion-amusement.
My third Frankfurt Book Fair (aka buchmesse, in German) ranks as the most productive yet in terms of spreading the good word about the library market, which has ample room to grow. All but a handful of American publishers are in the game 100 percent and invested in exploring how best to connect with collection development librarians and even end users, aka patrons. I wouldn’t be surprised to see experimentation with models in 2015. A message of ours at the fair: it would be great for the midlist and backlist if librarians had more choice in how they bought.
Canada, whose library system comes close to America’s on funding, is showing strong signs of expansion, possibly because of our entrance in March. At the show, I made it a goal to talk with Canadian publishers about how to leverage the Canadian-grown parts of their lists. My deepest thanks to Dundurn Press, ECW Press, Ebound Canada, University of Regina Press, De Marque, and ANEL for their time and feedback. You’ll see hopefully positive results from my experiments in early 2015.
The United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand glimmer not too far off on the horizon. The mood among publishers from those countries was overwhelmingly positive. I cannot say enough how much I appreciate the reception we’ve been given. Sending out undulations of gratitude to Emma House of the Publishers Association, Sandy Mahal formerly of The Reading Agency, Stephen Page of Faber & Faber, Zoe Dattner of Sleepers Publishing, and Chris McCrudden of Midas PR.   
Other reasons to love Frankfurt: Amazon was nowhere in sight, you feel the freedom to dream big, pork is sold in all corners, and the camaraderie is unlike that found any other fair in the world. This is a profession built on passion, make no mistake. I’m still high from being so close to so many brilliant minds.
Next year, I want to bring a librarian envoy. Raise your hand if you’re in.  
Zoom Info
Not that you’d notice I’ve been missing because the Tumblr keeps a-whirling no matter the weather, but in case you were wondering, this is what took up most of the last three weeks, in terms of planning and, you know, being there and not collapsing from exhaustion-amusement.
My third Frankfurt Book Fair (aka buchmesse, in German) ranks as the most productive yet in terms of spreading the good word about the library market, which has ample room to grow. All but a handful of American publishers are in the game 100 percent and invested in exploring how best to connect with collection development librarians and even end users, aka patrons. I wouldn’t be surprised to see experimentation with models in 2015. A message of ours at the fair: it would be great for the midlist and backlist if librarians had more choice in how they bought.
Canada, whose library system comes close to America’s on funding, is showing strong signs of expansion, possibly because of our entrance in March. At the show, I made it a goal to talk with Canadian publishers about how to leverage the Canadian-grown parts of their lists. My deepest thanks to Dundurn Press, ECW Press, Ebound Canada, University of Regina Press, De Marque, and ANEL for their time and feedback. You’ll see hopefully positive results from my experiments in early 2015.
The United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand glimmer not too far off on the horizon. The mood among publishers from those countries was overwhelmingly positive. I cannot say enough how much I appreciate the reception we’ve been given. Sending out undulations of gratitude to Emma House of the Publishers Association, Sandy Mahal formerly of The Reading Agency, Stephen Page of Faber & Faber, Zoe Dattner of Sleepers Publishing, and Chris McCrudden of Midas PR.   
Other reasons to love Frankfurt: Amazon was nowhere in sight, you feel the freedom to dream big, pork is sold in all corners, and the camaraderie is unlike that found any other fair in the world. This is a profession built on passion, make no mistake. I’m still high from being so close to so many brilliant minds.
Next year, I want to bring a librarian envoy. Raise your hand if you’re in.  
Zoom Info

Not that you’d notice I’ve been missing because the Tumblr keeps a-whirling no matter the weather, but in case you were wondering, this is what took up most of the last three weeks, in terms of planning and, you know, being there and not collapsing from exhaustion-amusement.

My third Frankfurt Book Fair (aka buchmesse, in German) ranks as the most productive yet in terms of spreading the good word about the library market, which has ample room to grow. All but a handful of American publishers are in the game 100 percent and invested in exploring how best to connect with collection development librarians and even end users, aka patrons. I wouldn’t be surprised to see experimentation with models in 2015. A message of ours at the fair: it would be great for the midlist and backlist if librarians had more choice in how they bought.

Canada, whose library system comes close to America’s on funding, is showing strong signs of expansion, possibly because of our entrance in March. At the show, I made it a goal to talk with Canadian publishers about how to leverage the Canadian-grown parts of their lists. My deepest thanks to Dundurn Press, ECW Press, Ebound Canada, University of Regina Press, De Marque, and ANEL for their time and feedback. You’ll see hopefully positive results from my experiments in early 2015.

The United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand glimmer not too far off on the horizon. The mood among publishers from those countries was overwhelmingly positive. I cannot say enough how much I appreciate the reception we’ve been given. Sending out undulations of gratitude to Emma House of the Publishers Association, Sandy Mahal formerly of The Reading Agency, Stephen Page of Faber & Faber, Zoe Dattner of Sleepers Publishing, and Chris McCrudden of Midas PR.   

Other reasons to love Frankfurt: Amazon was nowhere in sight, you feel the freedom to dream big, pork is sold in all corners, and the camaraderie is unlike that found any other fair in the world. This is a profession built on passion, make no mistake. I’m still high from being so close to so many brilliant minds.

Next year, I want to bring a librarian envoy. Raise your hand if you’re in.  

The best books I’ve encountered in recent months involving librarians. In both cases, they are viewed a bit as deviants in their time and space.
Zoom Info
The best books I’ve encountered in recent months involving librarians. In both cases, they are viewed a bit as deviants in their time and space.
Zoom Info

The best books I’ve encountered in recent months involving librarians. In both cases, they are viewed a bit as deviants in their time and space.

"Sjöwall and Wahlöö used an interesting technique. They would write alternate chapters individually, blending the realism and inherent tedium of police procedure with an irreverent commentary. Their brand of murder, bad weather, and social commentary continues to be very much in demand, as is evident in the success of Henning Mankell, Stieg Larsson, Jo Nesbø, Karin Fossum, and Arnaldur Indriðason."



- Jeremy McGraw gives a spot-on overview of the Martin Beck series, my current obsession, over at Crime Fiction Lover. Thanks to Abby Sesselberg of Darien Library for sharing. Now I have a guide to all ten books, which I can only liken to meeting your own psyche in book form. 



READERS’ ADVISORY You’ve all seen the trailer (the David Fincher-directed movie comes out October 3). But have your patrons read all the books that conjure the feel of Gillian Flynn’s best-selling Gone Girl (which remains a top-circulating Cloud title two years after publication)? After John Green’s The Fault Is in Our Stars, I don’t think there’s been a more urgent search for the perfect readalike.
To save you the trouble of re-reading all the book reviews, I’ve done so and consulted several public libraries’ suggestions for what to read next. A sampling is above, and you’ll find a shelf in CAT. And remember: one power reader’s frontlist is most people’s backlist. The long, long tail of Gone Girl indicates that she’s still being “discovered.”
Zoom Info
READERS’ ADVISORY You’ve all seen the trailer (the David Fincher-directed movie comes out October 3). But have your patrons read all the books that conjure the feel of Gillian Flynn’s best-selling Gone Girl (which remains a top-circulating Cloud title two years after publication)? After John Green’s The Fault Is in Our Stars, I don’t think there’s been a more urgent search for the perfect readalike.
To save you the trouble of re-reading all the book reviews, I’ve done so and consulted several public libraries’ suggestions for what to read next. A sampling is above, and you’ll find a shelf in CAT. And remember: one power reader’s frontlist is most people’s backlist. The long, long tail of Gone Girl indicates that she’s still being “discovered.”
Zoom Info
READERS’ ADVISORY You’ve all seen the trailer (the David Fincher-directed movie comes out October 3). But have your patrons read all the books that conjure the feel of Gillian Flynn’s best-selling Gone Girl (which remains a top-circulating Cloud title two years after publication)? After John Green’s The Fault Is in Our Stars, I don’t think there’s been a more urgent search for the perfect readalike.
To save you the trouble of re-reading all the book reviews, I’ve done so and consulted several public libraries’ suggestions for what to read next. A sampling is above, and you’ll find a shelf in CAT. And remember: one power reader’s frontlist is most people’s backlist. The long, long tail of Gone Girl indicates that she’s still being “discovered.”
Zoom Info
READERS’ ADVISORY You’ve all seen the trailer (the David Fincher-directed movie comes out October 3). But have your patrons read all the books that conjure the feel of Gillian Flynn’s best-selling Gone Girl (which remains a top-circulating Cloud title two years after publication)? After John Green’s The Fault Is in Our Stars, I don’t think there’s been a more urgent search for the perfect readalike.
To save you the trouble of re-reading all the book reviews, I’ve done so and consulted several public libraries’ suggestions for what to read next. A sampling is above, and you’ll find a shelf in CAT. And remember: one power reader’s frontlist is most people’s backlist. The long, long tail of Gone Girl indicates that she’s still being “discovered.”
Zoom Info
READERS’ ADVISORY You’ve all seen the trailer (the David Fincher-directed movie comes out October 3). But have your patrons read all the books that conjure the feel of Gillian Flynn’s best-selling Gone Girl (which remains a top-circulating Cloud title two years after publication)? After John Green’s The Fault Is in Our Stars, I don’t think there’s been a more urgent search for the perfect readalike.
To save you the trouble of re-reading all the book reviews, I’ve done so and consulted several public libraries’ suggestions for what to read next. A sampling is above, and you’ll find a shelf in CAT. And remember: one power reader’s frontlist is most people’s backlist. The long, long tail of Gone Girl indicates that she’s still being “discovered.”
Zoom Info
READERS’ ADVISORY You’ve all seen the trailer (the David Fincher-directed movie comes out October 3). But have your patrons read all the books that conjure the feel of Gillian Flynn’s best-selling Gone Girl (which remains a top-circulating Cloud title two years after publication)? After John Green’s The Fault Is in Our Stars, I don’t think there’s been a more urgent search for the perfect readalike.
To save you the trouble of re-reading all the book reviews, I’ve done so and consulted several public libraries’ suggestions for what to read next. A sampling is above, and you’ll find a shelf in CAT. And remember: one power reader’s frontlist is most people’s backlist. The long, long tail of Gone Girl indicates that she’s still being “discovered.”
Zoom Info
READERS’ ADVISORY You’ve all seen the trailer (the David Fincher-directed movie comes out October 3). But have your patrons read all the books that conjure the feel of Gillian Flynn’s best-selling Gone Girl (which remains a top-circulating Cloud title two years after publication)? After John Green’s The Fault Is in Our Stars, I don’t think there’s been a more urgent search for the perfect readalike.
To save you the trouble of re-reading all the book reviews, I’ve done so and consulted several public libraries’ suggestions for what to read next. A sampling is above, and you’ll find a shelf in CAT. And remember: one power reader’s frontlist is most people’s backlist. The long, long tail of Gone Girl indicates that she’s still being “discovered.”
Zoom Info
READERS’ ADVISORY You’ve all seen the trailer (the David Fincher-directed movie comes out October 3). But have your patrons read all the books that conjure the feel of Gillian Flynn’s best-selling Gone Girl (which remains a top-circulating Cloud title two years after publication)? After John Green’s The Fault Is in Our Stars, I don’t think there’s been a more urgent search for the perfect readalike.
To save you the trouble of re-reading all the book reviews, I’ve done so and consulted several public libraries’ suggestions for what to read next. A sampling is above, and you’ll find a shelf in CAT. And remember: one power reader’s frontlist is most people’s backlist. The long, long tail of Gone Girl indicates that she’s still being “discovered.”
Zoom Info

READERS’ ADVISORY You’ve all seen the trailer (the David Fincher-directed movie comes out October 3). But have your patrons read all the books that conjure the feel of Gillian Flynn’s best-selling Gone Girl (which remains a top-circulating Cloud title two years after publication)? After John Green’s The Fault Is in Our Stars, I don’t think there’s been a more urgent search for the perfect readalike.

To save you the trouble of re-reading all the book reviews, I’ve done so and consulted several public libraries’ suggestions for what to read next. A sampling is above, and you’ll find a shelf in CAT. And remember: one power reader’s frontlist is most people’s backlist. The long, long tail of Gone Girl indicates that she’s still being “discovered.”