CLOUD UNBOUND

Libraries, ebooks, publishing, and all the sublimely prickly stuff in between as viewed by Heather McCormack, Collection Development Manager, 3M Cloud Library

CLOUD UNBOUND

Libraries, ebooks, publishing, discovery
Here’s a question I field regularly: “Where in the name of ONIX 3.0 are the picture books, H-Dude?” Picture books, in case you’ve never attempted to shop for them, are notoriously difficult to locate in metadata. There is no BISAC category assigned to them, and not all publishers identify titles as picture books in descriptions, which are not searchable anyways.
Complicating matters further is format: many picture books, like Random House’s Dr. Seuss works, are published in fixed format epub, which no library vendor app currently supports (that’s changing for us in the near future).
The good news is that widely accessible, quality picture books do exist in ebook form. Take, for example, the latest entries in Cloud publishing partner Holiday House’s I Like To Read series, designed for emerging readers. The best way to identify picture books for the time being is to, well, read my Top New Releases newsletter every Friday. Drawing on information from library marketers, I break out children’s titles from juvenile and young adult titles, and I clearly mark picture books.
THE END!
Zoom Info
Here’s a question I field regularly: “Where in the name of ONIX 3.0 are the picture books, H-Dude?” Picture books, in case you’ve never attempted to shop for them, are notoriously difficult to locate in metadata. There is no BISAC category assigned to them, and not all publishers identify titles as picture books in descriptions, which are not searchable anyways.
Complicating matters further is format: many picture books, like Random House’s Dr. Seuss works, are published in fixed format epub, which no library vendor app currently supports (that’s changing for us in the near future).
The good news is that widely accessible, quality picture books do exist in ebook form. Take, for example, the latest entries in Cloud publishing partner Holiday House’s I Like To Read series, designed for emerging readers. The best way to identify picture books for the time being is to, well, read my Top New Releases newsletter every Friday. Drawing on information from library marketers, I break out children’s titles from juvenile and young adult titles, and I clearly mark picture books.
THE END!
Zoom Info
Here’s a question I field regularly: “Where in the name of ONIX 3.0 are the picture books, H-Dude?” Picture books, in case you’ve never attempted to shop for them, are notoriously difficult to locate in metadata. There is no BISAC category assigned to them, and not all publishers identify titles as picture books in descriptions, which are not searchable anyways.
Complicating matters further is format: many picture books, like Random House’s Dr. Seuss works, are published in fixed format epub, which no library vendor app currently supports (that’s changing for us in the near future).
The good news is that widely accessible, quality picture books do exist in ebook form. Take, for example, the latest entries in Cloud publishing partner Holiday House’s I Like To Read series, designed for emerging readers. The best way to identify picture books for the time being is to, well, read my Top New Releases newsletter every Friday. Drawing on information from library marketers, I break out children’s titles from juvenile and young adult titles, and I clearly mark picture books.
THE END!
Zoom Info
Here’s a question I field regularly: “Where in the name of ONIX 3.0 are the picture books, H-Dude?” Picture books, in case you’ve never attempted to shop for them, are notoriously difficult to locate in metadata. There is no BISAC category assigned to them, and not all publishers identify titles as picture books in descriptions, which are not searchable anyways.
Complicating matters further is format: many picture books, like Random House’s Dr. Seuss works, are published in fixed format epub, which no library vendor app currently supports (that’s changing for us in the near future).
The good news is that widely accessible, quality picture books do exist in ebook form. Take, for example, the latest entries in Cloud publishing partner Holiday House’s I Like To Read series, designed for emerging readers. The best way to identify picture books for the time being is to, well, read my Top New Releases newsletter every Friday. Drawing on information from library marketers, I break out children’s titles from juvenile and young adult titles, and I clearly mark picture books.
THE END!
Zoom Info

Here’s a question I field regularly: “Where in the name of ONIX 3.0 are the picture books, H-Dude?” Picture books, in case you’ve never attempted to shop for them, are notoriously difficult to locate in metadata. There is no BISAC category assigned to them, and not all publishers identify titles as picture books in descriptions, which are not searchable anyways.

Complicating matters further is format: many picture books, like Random House’s Dr. Seuss works, are published in fixed format epub, which no library vendor app currently supports (that’s changing for us in the near future).

The good news is that widely accessible, quality picture books do exist in ebook form. Take, for example, the latest entries in Cloud publishing partner Holiday House’s I Like To Read series, designed for emerging readers. The best way to identify picture books for the time being is to, well, read my Top New Releases newsletter every Friday. Drawing on information from library marketers, I break out children’s titles from juvenile and young adult titles, and I clearly mark picture books.

THE END!

Arty-farty galley photo, from ye auld iPhone camera roll. Congratulations, Donna Tartt.
Remember what Ruth Liebmann said on Twitter:

Loved THE GOLDFINCH. Inhaled it in 3 days. Glorious. Can’t believe that ARC is sitting unread on your shelf, darling.
— R.E. Liebmann (@yrstrulyREL) August 19, 2013

Arty-farty galley photo, from ye auld iPhone camera roll. Congratulations, Donna Tartt.

Remember what Ruth Liebmann said on Twitter:

"Wouldn’t you be surprised?"



- Best-selling novelist Donna Tartt to USA Today on winning the Pulitzer Prize for The Goldfinch, in Cloud from publishing partner Hachette Book Group USA.



I’m sitting here sick sipping soup and scrolling through my iPhone’s camera roll. Over the last 14 months, I have photographed two dozen libraries and bookstores in the name of enlightenment. New York, London, Paris, Sydney, Bismarck, Minneapolis, and Guadalajara. Let’s keep this whole even playing field going.
Happy National Library Week!
Zoom Info
I’m sitting here sick sipping soup and scrolling through my iPhone’s camera roll. Over the last 14 months, I have photographed two dozen libraries and bookstores in the name of enlightenment. New York, London, Paris, Sydney, Bismarck, Minneapolis, and Guadalajara. Let’s keep this whole even playing field going.
Happy National Library Week!
Zoom Info
I’m sitting here sick sipping soup and scrolling through my iPhone’s camera roll. Over the last 14 months, I have photographed two dozen libraries and bookstores in the name of enlightenment. New York, London, Paris, Sydney, Bismarck, Minneapolis, and Guadalajara. Let’s keep this whole even playing field going.
Happy National Library Week!
Zoom Info
I’m sitting here sick sipping soup and scrolling through my iPhone’s camera roll. Over the last 14 months, I have photographed two dozen libraries and bookstores in the name of enlightenment. New York, London, Paris, Sydney, Bismarck, Minneapolis, and Guadalajara. Let’s keep this whole even playing field going.
Happy National Library Week!
Zoom Info
I’m sitting here sick sipping soup and scrolling through my iPhone’s camera roll. Over the last 14 months, I have photographed two dozen libraries and bookstores in the name of enlightenment. New York, London, Paris, Sydney, Bismarck, Minneapolis, and Guadalajara. Let’s keep this whole even playing field going.
Happy National Library Week!
Zoom Info
I’m sitting here sick sipping soup and scrolling through my iPhone’s camera roll. Over the last 14 months, I have photographed two dozen libraries and bookstores in the name of enlightenment. New York, London, Paris, Sydney, Bismarck, Minneapolis, and Guadalajara. Let’s keep this whole even playing field going.
Happy National Library Week!
Zoom Info
I’m sitting here sick sipping soup and scrolling through my iPhone’s camera roll. Over the last 14 months, I have photographed two dozen libraries and bookstores in the name of enlightenment. New York, London, Paris, Sydney, Bismarck, Minneapolis, and Guadalajara. Let’s keep this whole even playing field going.
Happy National Library Week!
Zoom Info
I’m sitting here sick sipping soup and scrolling through my iPhone’s camera roll. Over the last 14 months, I have photographed two dozen libraries and bookstores in the name of enlightenment. New York, London, Paris, Sydney, Bismarck, Minneapolis, and Guadalajara. Let’s keep this whole even playing field going.
Happy National Library Week!
Zoom Info
I’m sitting here sick sipping soup and scrolling through my iPhone’s camera roll. Over the last 14 months, I have photographed two dozen libraries and bookstores in the name of enlightenment. New York, London, Paris, Sydney, Bismarck, Minneapolis, and Guadalajara. Let’s keep this whole even playing field going.
Happy National Library Week!
Zoom Info
I’m sitting here sick sipping soup and scrolling through my iPhone’s camera roll. Over the last 14 months, I have photographed two dozen libraries and bookstores in the name of enlightenment. New York, London, Paris, Sydney, Bismarck, Minneapolis, and Guadalajara. Let’s keep this whole even playing field going.
Happy National Library Week!
Zoom Info

I’m sitting here sick sipping soup and scrolling through my iPhone’s camera roll. Over the last 14 months, I have photographed two dozen libraries and bookstores in the name of enlightenment. New York, London, Paris, Sydney, Bismarck, Minneapolis, and Guadalajara. Let’s keep this whole even playing field going.

Happy National Library Week!

It occurred to me that I haven’t shared my favored textual stimulation lately. So here it is, another notch in my totem pole of popular music autobiography.
The former bassist for Public Image Limited, a darling band of the UK postpunk scene, Wobble writes directly and with no other motivation than to document his musical and personal journey, with the occasional borderline bitchy comment on other players and smooth operators he’s encountered, though he always aspires to be fair.
This is most definitely not aspirational literature (the only example of that in this genre is Morrissey’s Autobiography, from Cloud publishing partner Penguin). That said, it’s still an education in a creative profession based on fickle supply and demand: it kicks you in the bollocks, repeatedly, and if you can muster the energy a la Wobble, you get back up, happier and more assured of your spiritual direction.
If you love London, Wobble is also a sage chronicler of its gentrification over the last 25 years. His East End charm jumped off the page and slapped me on the back.
Thanks to my friend gallerist and sublime arbiter of taste Stephanie Theodore for pointing me in the book’s direction and in fact for securing me an autographed UK copy. She knows the man, naturally.
This one’s a counterpoint to a top-five memoir, Rotten: No Irish, No Blacks, No Dogs by John Lydon (aka Johnny Rotten, Wobble’s former PiL bandmate). You might experience demand for all things Sex Pistols, PiL, or postpunk when Rotten has a second go at autobiography this fall.
Zoom Info
It occurred to me that I haven’t shared my favored textual stimulation lately. So here it is, another notch in my totem pole of popular music autobiography.
The former bassist for Public Image Limited, a darling band of the UK postpunk scene, Wobble writes directly and with no other motivation than to document his musical and personal journey, with the occasional borderline bitchy comment on other players and smooth operators he’s encountered, though he always aspires to be fair.
This is most definitely not aspirational literature (the only example of that in this genre is Morrissey’s Autobiography, from Cloud publishing partner Penguin). That said, it’s still an education in a creative profession based on fickle supply and demand: it kicks you in the bollocks, repeatedly, and if you can muster the energy a la Wobble, you get back up, happier and more assured of your spiritual direction.
If you love London, Wobble is also a sage chronicler of its gentrification over the last 25 years. His East End charm jumped off the page and slapped me on the back.
Thanks to my friend gallerist and sublime arbiter of taste Stephanie Theodore for pointing me in the book’s direction and in fact for securing me an autographed UK copy. She knows the man, naturally.
This one’s a counterpoint to a top-five memoir, Rotten: No Irish, No Blacks, No Dogs by John Lydon (aka Johnny Rotten, Wobble’s former PiL bandmate). You might experience demand for all things Sex Pistols, PiL, or postpunk when Rotten has a second go at autobiography this fall.
Zoom Info

It occurred to me that I haven’t shared my favored textual stimulation lately. So here it is, another notch in my totem pole of popular music autobiography.

The former bassist for Public Image Limited, a darling band of the UK postpunk scene, Wobble writes directly and with no other motivation than to document his musical and personal journey, with the occasional borderline bitchy comment on other players and smooth operators he’s encountered, though he always aspires to be fair.

This is most definitely not aspirational literature (the only example of that in this genre is Morrissey’s Autobiography, from Cloud publishing partner Penguin). That said, it’s still an education in a creative profession based on fickle supply and demand: it kicks you in the bollocks, repeatedly, and if you can muster the energy a la Wobble, you get back up, happier and more assured of your spiritual direction.

If you love London, Wobble is also a sage chronicler of its gentrification over the last 25 years. His East End charm jumped off the page and slapped me on the back.

Thanks to my friend gallerist and sublime arbiter of taste Stephanie Theodore for pointing me in the book’s direction and in fact for securing me an autographed UK copy. She knows the man, naturally.

This one’s a counterpoint to a top-five memoir, Rotten: No Irish, No Blacks, No Dogs by John Lydon (aka Johnny Rotten, Wobble’s former PiL bandmate). You might experience demand for all things Sex Pistols, PiL, or postpunk when Rotten has a second go at autobiography this fall.