CLOUD UNBOUND

Libraries, ebooks, publishing, and all the sublimely prickly stuff in between as viewed by Heather McCormack, Collection Development Manager, 3M Cloud Library

CLOUD UNBOUND

Libraries, ebooks, publishing, discovery

"I was interested in recounting how a long friendship between two women could endure and survive in spite of good and bad feelings, dependence and rebellion, mutual support and betrayal."



- Italian novelist Elena Ferrante on her internationally acclaimed Neapolitan Trilogy in Vogue



PUBLISHING CRUSH OF THE WEEK Cloud publishing partner Europa Editions is, like many indie presses that specialize in international literature, too easily overlooked during ebook collection development.
However, with the publication next week of Elena Ferrante’s Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, the closing volume in her culty-on-American-shores Neapolitan Trilogy, Europa should become a standard press to mine for fiction to feed your power readers. Book critic John Freeman of The Australian has described Ferrante’s style like so: “Imagine if Jane Austen got angry, and you’ll have some idea how explosive these works are.” The Neapolitan Trilogy is about two women’s friendship through the years: meaty, excruciating, and perfect as we transition into fall.
Expect demand, as the level of press coverage has been impressive. Megan O’Grady for Vogue scored an interview (though not in person) with the media-shy author who has never been photographed, and in The New York Times Magazine, Gideon Lewis-Kraus, Meghan O’Rourke, and Emily Gould offered glowing tributes.  
Zoom Info
PUBLISHING CRUSH OF THE WEEK Cloud publishing partner Europa Editions is, like many indie presses that specialize in international literature, too easily overlooked during ebook collection development.
However, with the publication next week of Elena Ferrante’s Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, the closing volume in her culty-on-American-shores Neapolitan Trilogy, Europa should become a standard press to mine for fiction to feed your power readers. Book critic John Freeman of The Australian has described Ferrante’s style like so: “Imagine if Jane Austen got angry, and you’ll have some idea how explosive these works are.” The Neapolitan Trilogy is about two women’s friendship through the years: meaty, excruciating, and perfect as we transition into fall.
Expect demand, as the level of press coverage has been impressive. Megan O’Grady for Vogue scored an interview (though not in person) with the media-shy author who has never been photographed, and in The New York Times Magazine, Gideon Lewis-Kraus, Meghan O’Rourke, and Emily Gould offered glowing tributes.  
Zoom Info
PUBLISHING CRUSH OF THE WEEK Cloud publishing partner Europa Editions is, like many indie presses that specialize in international literature, too easily overlooked during ebook collection development.
However, with the publication next week of Elena Ferrante’s Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, the closing volume in her culty-on-American-shores Neapolitan Trilogy, Europa should become a standard press to mine for fiction to feed your power readers. Book critic John Freeman of The Australian has described Ferrante’s style like so: “Imagine if Jane Austen got angry, and you’ll have some idea how explosive these works are.” The Neapolitan Trilogy is about two women’s friendship through the years: meaty, excruciating, and perfect as we transition into fall.
Expect demand, as the level of press coverage has been impressive. Megan O’Grady for Vogue scored an interview (though not in person) with the media-shy author who has never been photographed, and in The New York Times Magazine, Gideon Lewis-Kraus, Meghan O’Rourke, and Emily Gould offered glowing tributes.  
Zoom Info

PUBLISHING CRUSH OF THE WEEK Cloud publishing partner Europa Editions is, like many indie presses that specialize in international literature, too easily overlooked during ebook collection development.

However, with the publication next week of Elena Ferrante’s Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, the closing volume in her culty-on-American-shores Neapolitan Trilogy, Europa should become a standard press to mine for fiction to feed your power readers. Book critic John Freeman of The Australian has described Ferrante’s style like so: “Imagine if Jane Austen got angry, and you’ll have some idea how explosive these works are.” The Neapolitan Trilogy is about two women’s friendship through the years: meaty, excruciating, and perfect as we transition into fall.

Expect demand, as the level of press coverage has been impressive. Megan O’Grady for Vogue scored an interview (though not in person) with the media-shy author who has never been photographed, and in The New York Times Magazine, Gideon Lewis-Kraus, Meghan O’Rourke, and Emily Gould offered glowing tributes.  

"You could call Mitchell a global writer, but that does not quite capture what he is doing. It is closer to say that he is a pangaeic writer, a supercontinental writer. What is for geologists a physical fact, that the world is everywhere interconnected, bound together in a cycle of faulting and folding, rifting and drifting, erosion and uplift, is, for Mitchell, a metaphysical conviction."



- Kathryn Schulz in her much-tweeted profile of novelist David Mitchell, whose forthcoming The Bone Clocks is popping up all over prepub ordering best sellers lists.



It’s Waterproof!

I wanted to show you one of several marketing changes that are coming down the pike in light of our new prepublication ordering functionality. Observe a new regular list dubbed after Amazon’s Hot New Releases list!

I wanted to show you one of several marketing changes that are coming down the pike in light of our new prepublication ordering functionality. Observe a new regular list dubbed after Amazon’s Hot New Releases list!

KEY BACKLIST Last week, in her charming By the Book interview in The New York Times, my hero Malala Yousafzai sang the praises of two excellent but still-not-as-deservedly-well-known-as-they-should-be YA series: Deborah Ellis’s Breadwinner and Parvana’s Journey, both from Cloud publishing partner Groundwood Books (an imprint of Canadian indie House of Anansi).
Both illuminate life in non-Western society, and Mud City the perseverance of girls despite their being viewed as lesser people. And guess what? They are fine readalikes for another favorite of Yousafzai’s, Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner. 
(Update: It seems Yousafzai’s mentioning of Ellis’s books has pushed them to the top of Chapters Indigo best sellers list. Whee!)
Favorite question and answer:

"The last book that made you cry?"
"I never cry reading a book." 
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST Last week, in her charming By the Book interview in The New York Times, my hero Malala Yousafzai sang the praises of two excellent but still-not-as-deservedly-well-known-as-they-should-be YA series: Deborah Ellis’s Breadwinner and Parvana’s Journey, both from Cloud publishing partner Groundwood Books (an imprint of Canadian indie House of Anansi).
Both illuminate life in non-Western society, and Mud City the perseverance of girls despite their being viewed as lesser people. And guess what? They are fine readalikes for another favorite of Yousafzai’s, Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner. 
(Update: It seems Yousafzai’s mentioning of Ellis’s books has pushed them to the top of Chapters Indigo best sellers list. Whee!)
Favorite question and answer:

"The last book that made you cry?"
"I never cry reading a book." 
Zoom Info

KEY BACKLIST Last week, in her charming By the Book interview in The New York Times, my hero Malala Yousafzai sang the praises of two excellent but still-not-as-deservedly-well-known-as-they-should-be YA series: Deborah Ellis’s Breadwinner and Parvana’s Journey, both from Cloud publishing partner Groundwood Books (an imprint of Canadian indie House of Anansi).

Both illuminate life in non-Western society, and Mud City the perseverance of girls despite their being viewed as lesser people. And guess what? They are fine readalikes for another favorite of Yousafzai’s, Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner

(Update: It seems Yousafzai’s mentioning of Ellis’s books has pushed them to the top of Chapters Indigo best sellers list. Whee!)

Favorite question and answer:

"The last book that made you cry?"

"I never cry reading a book."