CLOUD UNBOUND

Libraries, ebooks, publishing, and all the sublimely prickly stuff in between as viewed by Heather McCormack, Collection Development Manager, 3M Cloud Library

CLOUD UNBOUND

Libraries, ebooks, publishing, discovery
It’s been a bruiser of a day. Let’s look at a book jacket from Australia, compliments of J.C.S. of Melbourne.

It’s been a bruiser of a day. Let’s look at a book jacket from Australia, compliments of J.C.S. of Melbourne.

Just off the phone with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt’s lovely digital marketer. Want, want, want Stacey D’Erasmo’s latest, Wonderland, which HMH is going to push hard.
I’m having visions of an older Neko Case.
Zoom Info
Just off the phone with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt’s lovely digital marketer. Want, want, want Stacey D’Erasmo’s latest, Wonderland, which HMH is going to push hard.
I’m having visions of an older Neko Case.
Zoom Info

Just off the phone with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt’s lovely digital marketer. Want, want, want Stacey D’Erasmo’s latest, Wonderland, which HMH is going to push hard.

I’m having visions of an older Neko Case.

Happy World Book Day/Night from Barcelona!

This message comes to us from the affable Mili Hernandez, who runs Cloud publishing partner Editorial Egales, the largest publisher of LGBT books in Spanish. I met Mili via translator and writer Lawrence Schimel at the Guadalajara International Book Fair last December. 

I love the question she posed to me at her booth: “How are you going to treat my books?” With great care and collection development sense, Mili. It sealed the deal.

Look for Editorial Egales’s core backlist in CAT soon. And if you’ve never heard of World Book Day/Night, read all about it here

What Amazon Prime might become.

jasonashlock:

"With the influx of unlimited subscription models for our digital lifestyle consumption, I decided to figure out how much it would cost for me to access to unlimited eBooks, Movies, Music, and Magazines," says Lo Min Ming

His answer: about $75. 

This is what I think Amazon Prime aims to be - a single subscription plan for everything…”

Yup.

And yet libraries are cheaper and have a wider selection if you’re willing to spend some time in holds queues.

"The novel, which is described in Hotel Florida as ‘a quasi-autobiographical chick-lit bildungsroman about three college girls looking for sex and the meaning of life but instead finding disillusion and the clap,’ sounds like something I’d actually like to read."



-

Jason Diamond of Flavorwire in his passionate bid to bring Martha Gellhorn’s debut novel, What Mad Pursuit (1934), back into print.

I have yet to undergo a Gellhorn phase, but it’s roiling somewhere inside my brain, choosing its moment carefully. Gellhorn was a badass, to quote Diamond, a fierce feminist and an uncompromising war correspondent (never mind her marriage to Ernest “Alkie” Hemingway).

If you weren’t satisfied with the recent HBO biopic (I thought Nicole Kidman channeled her character’s wartime steeliness well), Amanda Vaill’s Hotel Florida: Truth, Love, and Death in the Spanish Civil War, out today from Farrar, Straus & Giroux, is another point of entry into Gellhorn’s incredible life, per Diamond. 

Added to TBR pile.



Welcome to the latest installment in the Cloud Unbound author interview series. I’m happy to welcome back Ryann Uden, head of youth services at the Barrington Area Library, IL, who did a bang-up job interviewing Carrie Sessarego, a blogger who will do anything for a great blog post—including watching multiple TV and movie adaptations of three classic novels by Jane Austen. Tough gig, huh?
Now her posts have evolved into a charming book, Pride, Prejudice, and Popcorn, kicking off Harlequin’s new POP! nonfiction series focusing on popular culture topics. 
Over to Ryann!
RU: Your original posts on Smart Bitches, Trashy Books generated a lot of conversation about the movie adaptions. Why do you think readers continue to be emotionally connected with these classics stories?
CS: In the case of Jane Eyre, I think readers love the heroine. It’s a very modern novel in the sense that the heroine feels trapped by her class and her gender. People love Jane and love to see her come out alright in the end. In the case of Wuthering Heights, I think people are compelled by the strength of the emotion in the book. In the case of Pride and Prejudice, it’s a very modern kind of romance novel, with a story in which two people who hate one another on sight learn to appreciate each other. Plus Darcy is mysterious, unattainable, handsome, rich, brooding, and capable of saving the day, the prototype romantic hero!
RU: You’ve been a longtime fan of Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, and Pride and Prejudice. As you wrote this book, did you see anything in a new or different way?
CS: Absolutely. I’ve always loved Jane Eyre as a book, but watching the adaptations reminded me both of how much Jane longs for family and also of just how awful Rochester is during most of the story. I admired Pride and Prejudice as a book before I saw any adaptations but I didn’t “get” it—I thought it lacked excitement. Watching the actors showed me that the book is written in a kind of code. There are plenty of high emotions, but they are left unspoken and unexpressed, so you have to watch and read for clues. That opened up the story for me, and now I can truly say that Pride and Prejudice is one of my favorite books.
Most adaptations of Wuthering Heights cut everything that happens after Cathy’s death, and that omission, compared to adaptations who follow the book all the way through, showed me how important the second half of the book is in establishing the true message of the book.
RU: You discuss how Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights are both examples of Gothic literature. What do you think attracts readers to Gothic literature?
CS: I think it’s the fact that everything is over-the-top. It has a cheesy allure. I’m a total sucker for Gothic.
RU: You mention how people either love or hate these titles, especially Wuthering Heights. What would you like readers to know about this title that might change how they view the story?
CS: I would like people to know that Wuthering Heights isn’t a romance. It’s a cautionary tale about selfish obsession. It’s also a fascinating and horrifying look at how people’s lives are affected by the social and economic environments that surround them. The true heroes of Wuthering Heights are Cathy’s daughter and Hindley’s son, who are able to learn to love in a selfless way and thus achieve some happiness even though their external environments are still oppressive.
RU: You include fascinating information about the authors’ lives. f you could travel back in time, what would you tell the Brontë sisters about their literary legacies?
CS: Well, for one thing, I’d tell the sisters to wash their hands, cover their mouths, and for heaven’s sake, move away from the town where the drinking water is contaminated by run-off from the cemetery! I’d also love to talk to Charlotte Bronte and try to persuade her that Emily’s legacy does not need protecting. In her quest to protect Emily from any scandal, she burned a lot of Emily’s writings. Ouch!
RU: If you were to cast a future, high-quality production of Pride and Prejudice, who would you cast as the lead characters?
CS: Oh, wow, it’s hard to beat the casting I’ve already seen. I’d like to see Emma Watson as Elizabeth Bennet, and I think Scarlett Johansson would be a good Jane. Oooh, and Tom Hiddleston as Mister Darcy, perhaps? He might be a little too old to play opposite Emma Watson, but I think it could work. He would also be a good Bingley. It’s a little-known fact that Regency England had plenty of people of color as residents. Wouldn’t Chiwetel Ejiofor be great as either the endlessly understanding Colonel Fitzwilliam or as the deviously charming Wickham? See, now I’m kind of excited for this movie to happen!
RU: What’s next? Are you researching any other book/movie adaptations?
CS: My next book for HarlequinPop! is Love at Stake: Romance in Buffy the Vampire Slayer. It will be out in the summer of 2014, and I’m very excited! I’m just starting work on my third book, in which I compare the ways that Bella, Buffy, and Katniss, from Twilight, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Hunger Games, deal with issues of power and control.
RU: Do you have a favorite book that you wish someone would make into a movie?
CS: Usually I don’t like it when a book is made into a movie because I’m afraid they’ll ruin it. But I’d like to see a movie based on the Honor Harrington series by David Weber. It looks like I might get my wish since a movie is in preproduction now.
RU: Beyond the three titles you focus on in this book, do you have a favorite literary adaption that you feel movie-makers got right?
CS: I thought Peter Jackson’s adaptation of the Lord of the Rings trilogy was brilliant.
RU: Finally, if someone were to make your book into a movie, who would play you?
CS: Janeane Garofalo, without a doubt.
Zoom Info
Welcome to the latest installment in the Cloud Unbound author interview series. I’m happy to welcome back Ryann Uden, head of youth services at the Barrington Area Library, IL, who did a bang-up job interviewing Carrie Sessarego, a blogger who will do anything for a great blog post—including watching multiple TV and movie adaptations of three classic novels by Jane Austen. Tough gig, huh?
Now her posts have evolved into a charming book, Pride, Prejudice, and Popcorn, kicking off Harlequin’s new POP! nonfiction series focusing on popular culture topics. 
Over to Ryann!
RU: Your original posts on Smart Bitches, Trashy Books generated a lot of conversation about the movie adaptions. Why do you think readers continue to be emotionally connected with these classics stories?
CS: In the case of Jane Eyre, I think readers love the heroine. It’s a very modern novel in the sense that the heroine feels trapped by her class and her gender. People love Jane and love to see her come out alright in the end. In the case of Wuthering Heights, I think people are compelled by the strength of the emotion in the book. In the case of Pride and Prejudice, it’s a very modern kind of romance novel, with a story in which two people who hate one another on sight learn to appreciate each other. Plus Darcy is mysterious, unattainable, handsome, rich, brooding, and capable of saving the day, the prototype romantic hero!
RU: You’ve been a longtime fan of Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, and Pride and Prejudice. As you wrote this book, did you see anything in a new or different way?
CS: Absolutely. I’ve always loved Jane Eyre as a book, but watching the adaptations reminded me both of how much Jane longs for family and also of just how awful Rochester is during most of the story. I admired Pride and Prejudice as a book before I saw any adaptations but I didn’t “get” it—I thought it lacked excitement. Watching the actors showed me that the book is written in a kind of code. There are plenty of high emotions, but they are left unspoken and unexpressed, so you have to watch and read for clues. That opened up the story for me, and now I can truly say that Pride and Prejudice is one of my favorite books.
Most adaptations of Wuthering Heights cut everything that happens after Cathy’s death, and that omission, compared to adaptations who follow the book all the way through, showed me how important the second half of the book is in establishing the true message of the book.
RU: You discuss how Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights are both examples of Gothic literature. What do you think attracts readers to Gothic literature?
CS: I think it’s the fact that everything is over-the-top. It has a cheesy allure. I’m a total sucker for Gothic.
RU: You mention how people either love or hate these titles, especially Wuthering Heights. What would you like readers to know about this title that might change how they view the story?
CS: I would like people to know that Wuthering Heights isn’t a romance. It’s a cautionary tale about selfish obsession. It’s also a fascinating and horrifying look at how people’s lives are affected by the social and economic environments that surround them. The true heroes of Wuthering Heights are Cathy’s daughter and Hindley’s son, who are able to learn to love in a selfless way and thus achieve some happiness even though their external environments are still oppressive.
RU: You include fascinating information about the authors’ lives. f you could travel back in time, what would you tell the Brontë sisters about their literary legacies?
CS: Well, for one thing, I’d tell the sisters to wash their hands, cover their mouths, and for heaven’s sake, move away from the town where the drinking water is contaminated by run-off from the cemetery! I’d also love to talk to Charlotte Bronte and try to persuade her that Emily’s legacy does not need protecting. In her quest to protect Emily from any scandal, she burned a lot of Emily’s writings. Ouch!
RU: If you were to cast a future, high-quality production of Pride and Prejudice, who would you cast as the lead characters?
CS: Oh, wow, it’s hard to beat the casting I’ve already seen. I’d like to see Emma Watson as Elizabeth Bennet, and I think Scarlett Johansson would be a good Jane. Oooh, and Tom Hiddleston as Mister Darcy, perhaps? He might be a little too old to play opposite Emma Watson, but I think it could work. He would also be a good Bingley. It’s a little-known fact that Regency England had plenty of people of color as residents. Wouldn’t Chiwetel Ejiofor be great as either the endlessly understanding Colonel Fitzwilliam or as the deviously charming Wickham? See, now I’m kind of excited for this movie to happen!
RU: What’s next? Are you researching any other book/movie adaptations?
CS: My next book for HarlequinPop! is Love at Stake: Romance in Buffy the Vampire Slayer. It will be out in the summer of 2014, and I’m very excited! I’m just starting work on my third book, in which I compare the ways that Bella, Buffy, and Katniss, from Twilight, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Hunger Games, deal with issues of power and control.
RU: Do you have a favorite book that you wish someone would make into a movie?
CS: Usually I don’t like it when a book is made into a movie because I’m afraid they’ll ruin it. But I’d like to see a movie based on the Honor Harrington series by David Weber. It looks like I might get my wish since a movie is in preproduction now.
RU: Beyond the three titles you focus on in this book, do you have a favorite literary adaption that you feel movie-makers got right?
CS: I thought Peter Jackson’s adaptation of the Lord of the Rings trilogy was brilliant.
RU: Finally, if someone were to make your book into a movie, who would play you?
CS: Janeane Garofalo, without a doubt.
Zoom Info

Welcome to the latest installment in the Cloud Unbound author interview series. I’m happy to welcome back Ryann Uden, head of youth services at the Barrington Area Library, IL, who did a bang-up job interviewing Carrie Sessarego, a blogger who will do anything for a great blog post—including watching multiple TV and movie adaptations of three classic novels by Jane Austen. Tough gig, huh?

Now her posts have evolved into a charming book, Pride, Prejudice, and Popcorn, kicking off Harlequin’s new POP! nonfiction series focusing on popular culture topics. 

Over to Ryann!

RU: Your original posts on Smart Bitches, Trashy Books generated a lot of conversation about the movie adaptions. Why do you think readers continue to be emotionally connected with these classics stories?

CS: In the case of Jane Eyre, I think readers love the heroine. It’s a very modern novel in the sense that the heroine feels trapped by her class and her gender. People love Jane and love to see her come out alright in the end. In the case of Wuthering Heights, I think people are compelled by the strength of the emotion in the book. In the case of Pride and Prejudice, it’s a very modern kind of romance novel, with a story in which two people who hate one another on sight learn to appreciate each other. Plus Darcy is mysterious, unattainable, handsome, rich, brooding, and capable of saving the day, the prototype romantic hero!

RU: You’ve been a longtime fan of Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, and Pride and Prejudice. As you wrote this book, did you see anything in a new or different way?

CS: Absolutely. I’ve always loved Jane Eyre as a book, but watching the adaptations reminded me both of how much Jane longs for family and also of just how awful Rochester is during most of the story. I admired Pride and Prejudice as a book before I saw any adaptations but I didn’t “get” itI thought it lacked excitement. Watching the actors showed me that the book is written in a kind of code. There are plenty of high emotions, but they are left unspoken and unexpressed, so you have to watch and read for clues. That opened up the story for me, and now I can truly say that Pride and Prejudice is one of my favorite books.

Most adaptations of Wuthering Heights cut everything that happens after Cathy’s death, and that omission, compared to adaptations who follow the book all the way through, showed me how important the second half of the book is in establishing the true message of the book.

RU: You discuss how Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights are both examples of Gothic literature. What do you think attracts readers to Gothic literature?

CS: I think it’s the fact that everything is over-the-top. It has a cheesy allure. I’m a total sucker for Gothic.

RU: You mention how people either love or hate these titles, especially Wuthering Heights. What would you like readers to know about this title that might change how they view the story?

CS: I would like people to know that Wuthering Heights isn’t a romance. It’s a cautionary tale about selfish obsession. It’s also a fascinating and horrifying look at how people’s lives are affected by the social and economic environments that surround them. The true heroes of Wuthering Heights are Cathy’s daughter and Hindley’s son, who are able to learn to love in a selfless way and thus achieve some happiness even though their external environments are still oppressive.

RU: You include fascinating information about the authors’ lives. f you could travel back in time, what would you tell the Brontë sisters about their literary legacies?

CS: Well, for one thing, I’d tell the sisters to wash their hands, cover their mouths, and for heaven’s sake, move away from the town where the drinking water is contaminated by run-off from the cemetery! I’d also love to talk to Charlotte Bronte and try to persuade her that Emily’s legacy does not need protecting. In her quest to protect Emily from any scandal, she burned a lot of Emily’s writings. Ouch!

RU: If you were to cast a future, high-quality production of Pride and Prejudice, who would you cast as the lead characters?

CS: Oh, wow, it’s hard to beat the casting I’ve already seen. I’d like to see Emma Watson as Elizabeth Bennet, and I think Scarlett Johansson would be a good Jane. Oooh, and Tom Hiddleston as Mister Darcy, perhaps? He might be a little too old to play opposite Emma Watson, but I think it could work. He would also be a good Bingley. It’s a little-known fact that Regency England had plenty of people of color as residents. Wouldn’t Chiwetel Ejiofor be great as either the endlessly understanding Colonel Fitzwilliam or as the deviously charming Wickham? See, now I’m kind of excited for this movie to happen!

RU: What’s next? Are you researching any other book/movie adaptations?

CS: My next book for HarlequinPop! is Love at Stake: Romance in Buffy the Vampire Slayer. It will be out in the summer of 2014, and I’m very excited! I’m just starting work on my third book, in which I compare the ways that Bella, Buffy, and Katniss, from Twilight, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Hunger Games, deal with issues of power and control.

RU: Do you have a favorite book that you wish someone would make into a movie?

CS: Usually I don’t like it when a book is made into a movie because I’m afraid they’ll ruin it. But I’d like to see a movie based on the Honor Harrington series by David Weber. It looks like I might get my wish since a movie is in preproduction now.

RU: Beyond the three titles you focus on in this book, do you have a favorite literary adaption that you feel movie-makers got right?

CS: I thought Peter Jackson’s adaptation of the Lord of the Rings trilogy was brilliant.

RU: Finally, if someone were to make your book into a movie, who would play you?

CS: Janeane Garofalo, without a doubt.