CLOUD UNBOUND

Libraries, ebooks, publishing, and all the sublimely prickly stuff in between as viewed by Heather McCormack, Collection Development Manager, 3M Cloud Library

CLOUD UNBOUND

Libraries, ebooks, publishing, discovery
Happy Banned Books Week! You know how we celebrate? By marketing obscene amounts of ebooks. 

Happy Banned Books Week! You know how we celebrate? By marketing obscene amounts of ebooks. 

2014: A Very Good Year for Backlist

Marquez joins Harper Lee, as well as Georges Simenon and Tove Jansson

KEY BACKLIST Last week, the longlist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize was released, and if you’re desperately seeking fresh suggestions for your literary fiction fiends, this is the resource. Canada’s most prestigious and well-endowed book award for fiction, the Giller has the reputation among U.S. collection development librarians for shining the spotlight on gems that more often than not don’t receive a lot of press on this side of the border.
Like the contemporary literature of Australia (which I’ve read pretty widely the last three years), Canadian fiction tends to invest a lot in place and voice. Luckily for American Cloud librarians and their patrons, we’ve got four of the titles on the longlist: Heather O’Neill’s The Girl Who Was Saturday Night (Farrar), Jennifer LoveGrove’s Watch How We Walk (ECW Press), Arjun Basu’s Waiting for the Man (ECW Press), and Kathy Page’s Paradise Elsewhere: Stories (Biblioasis).  
You’ll find these and other juicy reads on the September 2014 Key Backlist shelf in CAT US. It goes without saying that the entire longlist is available to our Canadian customers.
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST Last week, the longlist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize was released, and if you’re desperately seeking fresh suggestions for your literary fiction fiends, this is the resource. Canada’s most prestigious and well-endowed book award for fiction, the Giller has the reputation among U.S. collection development librarians for shining the spotlight on gems that more often than not don’t receive a lot of press on this side of the border.
Like the contemporary literature of Australia (which I’ve read pretty widely the last three years), Canadian fiction tends to invest a lot in place and voice. Luckily for American Cloud librarians and their patrons, we’ve got four of the titles on the longlist: Heather O’Neill’s The Girl Who Was Saturday Night (Farrar), Jennifer LoveGrove’s Watch How We Walk (ECW Press), Arjun Basu’s Waiting for the Man (ECW Press), and Kathy Page’s Paradise Elsewhere: Stories (Biblioasis).  
You’ll find these and other juicy reads on the September 2014 Key Backlist shelf in CAT US. It goes without saying that the entire longlist is available to our Canadian customers.
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST Last week, the longlist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize was released, and if you’re desperately seeking fresh suggestions for your literary fiction fiends, this is the resource. Canada’s most prestigious and well-endowed book award for fiction, the Giller has the reputation among U.S. collection development librarians for shining the spotlight on gems that more often than not don’t receive a lot of press on this side of the border.
Like the contemporary literature of Australia (which I’ve read pretty widely the last three years), Canadian fiction tends to invest a lot in place and voice. Luckily for American Cloud librarians and their patrons, we’ve got four of the titles on the longlist: Heather O’Neill’s The Girl Who Was Saturday Night (Farrar), Jennifer LoveGrove’s Watch How We Walk (ECW Press), Arjun Basu’s Waiting for the Man (ECW Press), and Kathy Page’s Paradise Elsewhere: Stories (Biblioasis).  
You’ll find these and other juicy reads on the September 2014 Key Backlist shelf in CAT US. It goes without saying that the entire longlist is available to our Canadian customers.
Zoom Info
KEY BACKLIST Last week, the longlist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize was released, and if you’re desperately seeking fresh suggestions for your literary fiction fiends, this is the resource. Canada’s most prestigious and well-endowed book award for fiction, the Giller has the reputation among U.S. collection development librarians for shining the spotlight on gems that more often than not don’t receive a lot of press on this side of the border.
Like the contemporary literature of Australia (which I’ve read pretty widely the last three years), Canadian fiction tends to invest a lot in place and voice. Luckily for American Cloud librarians and their patrons, we’ve got four of the titles on the longlist: Heather O’Neill’s The Girl Who Was Saturday Night (Farrar), Jennifer LoveGrove’s Watch How We Walk (ECW Press), Arjun Basu’s Waiting for the Man (ECW Press), and Kathy Page’s Paradise Elsewhere: Stories (Biblioasis).  
You’ll find these and other juicy reads on the September 2014 Key Backlist shelf in CAT US. It goes without saying that the entire longlist is available to our Canadian customers.
Zoom Info

KEY BACKLIST Last week, the longlist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize was released, and if you’re desperately seeking fresh suggestions for your literary fiction fiends, this is the resource. Canada’s most prestigious and well-endowed book award for fiction, the Giller has the reputation among U.S. collection development librarians for shining the spotlight on gems that more often than not don’t receive a lot of press on this side of the border.

Like the contemporary literature of Australia (which I’ve read pretty widely the last three years), Canadian fiction tends to invest a lot in place and voice. Luckily for American Cloud librarians and their patrons, we’ve got four of the titles on the longlist: Heather O’Neill’s The Girl Who Was Saturday Night (Farrar), Jennifer LoveGrove’s Watch How We Walk (ECW Press), Arjun Basu’s Waiting for the Man (ECW Press), and Kathy Page’s Paradise Elsewhere: Stories (Biblioasis).  

You’ll find these and other juicy reads on the September 2014 Key Backlist shelf in CAT US. It goes without saying that the entire longlist is available to our Canadian customers.

"The Kindle HD Kids Edition is designed especially for children. It comes it 6-inch and 7-inch versions, front and rear facing cameras and a high-resolution screen. Amazon emphasizes that the Kids Edition is a high performance device and ‘is not a toy.’"



- Publishers Weekly reports on the latest Amazon hardware updates. The kiddie Kindle is the most notable aspect for me. I envision children’s librarians getting slammed hard after the holidays this year. Just sayin’.



Hmmm…

Your thoughts are appreciated.